SACRED PLACE
06
Mar

SACRED PLACE

»

Dirigido a

Estudiantes de grado de la UCC, tanto estudiantes regulares de la UCC como estudiantes internacionales de programas no formales. El curso se dicta en ingl├ęs sin costo a nuestros alumnos y se enmarca dentro las actividades de la Casa de la Mateada de Loyola Marymount University. El costo laboral de los docentes est├í a cargo de mencionada instituci├│n.

Precio

Consultar

Inicio

06/03/2017

DuraciÓn

3 meses.

Lugar

Sede Trejo UCC - Aula a confirmar.

DESCRIPCIÓN

This class considers the deep and fundamental connection that exists between place and human identity. How does place shape identity? How do our deepest emotions and values, including those that we consider to be part of our spiritual life, come to be so closely tied to the places we inhabit? What kind of loss is it
» to our identity, sense of meaning, even our sense of God
» when these places are lost or degradated? Throught a critical interdisciplinary examination of the relationship between spirituality and ecology, students will be invited to consider these questions from the perspective of spirituality
» especially contemplative traditions of spiritual practice
» asking how our feeling for place (and for the natural world as a whole) shapes spiritual experience and practice and how our deepest spiritual values can inform ethical responsibility toward the earth.

Objetivos


» To become articulate and knowledgeable about the role of place in shaping spiritual identity, about the contributions of spiritual practice to the development of a strong and vital sense of place, and about the significance of "place
» making" as a critical cultural activity.

» To develop a critical understanding of contribution contemplative thought and practice can make to sustainable ecological practice, in particular as this comes to expression in the "slow food movement".

» To learn how to integrate practice and practical experience into an emerging understanding of the relationship between spirituality, ecological responsibility, and social justice.

Contenido

The Spanish philosopher Jos├ę Ortega y Gasset once said: ┬┐Tell me the landscape in which you live and I will tell you who you are.┬┐ Here we find a beautiful expression of the deep and fundamental connection that exists between place and human identity. But how in fact does place shape identity? How is it that our deepest emotions and values, including those that we consider to be part of our spiritual life, come to be so closely tied to the places we inhabit? What kind of loss is it┬┐to our identity, sense of meaning, even our sense of God┬┐when these places are lost or degraded? Can a sense of wholeness be recovered┬┐in ourselves and in the world? If so, what new sensibilities and practices will we need to realize this renewal?
During the past fifty years, patterns of ecological destruction have continued to deepen throughout the world; places, species, entire ecosystems are being lost to us. Increasingly, this has come to be experienced not simply as an environmental crisis, but also as a spiritual crisis of immense proportions. At the heart of this crisis, some have argued, is a profound loss of a sense of place, a sense of alienation from the places we inhabit and from ourselves.

This course will examine this former issue by asking what it means to lose a sense of place, whether it is possible to recover it, and how such work can contribute to a renewed commitment to the places we inhabit. Students will consider these questions from the perspective of spirituality-- especially contemplative traditions of spiritual practice┬┐asking themselves how our feeling for place (and for the natural world as a whole) shapes spiritual experience and practice and how our deepest spiritual values can inform ethical responsibility toward the earth. Also how our alienation from place contributes to deepening patterns of environmental degradation. Particular attention will be given to the creative potential of the world-wide ┬┐Slow Food Movement┬┐┬┐emblematic of an emerging sense of place that seeks to recover a more embodied, ecologically conscious, spiritually aware and socially just way of living in the world.

By an exchange of theoretical and practical exercises and readings, we will try to develop a meta- analysis of personal trajectories, but from the perspective of the most vulnerable sectors of the world┬┐s population. We also will seek to address a feasibility analysis of this perspective, so that it results motivational for the specific potential of each student in his professional practice, on a transforming perspective of the place that each one will occupy in the near future.


Docentes

Dr. Stauber, Juan Carlos (Disertante )





Informes

Fundación Jean Sonet - info@fjs.ucc.edu.ar (0351) 4938000 Int. 183/184/186 (de 8 a 16h)






Consultanos por este curso

Áreas de interés